Sunday, July 20, 2008

Medication on your travel

























When travelling, it is smart to bring some basic medication. I experienced this as I got stomach flu while flying from Boston to Reykjavik two years ago. Conditions like these are preventable. Visit your local pharmacy and seek advice. Here are a few pieces of advice from Enjoy Food & Travel on medication on your travels.


Packing of important medication

Many of us are on medication to treat different illnesses. If medication must be taken without interruption, remember that your luggage may end up on the wrong flight. I highly recommend that you pack life important medication for your whole travel in your hand luggage, as well as in your suit case. In this way you will have the amount necessary for the whole duration of your trip available even if your luggage is lost.

Fear of flying?

If you have hypertension or a heart condition, and hate to fly, alcohol provides a bad solution during long flights. Alcohol dehydrates you seriously and it is strongly recommended that you drink water instead of booze.

Your physician may prescribe a tranquilizer for you in order to maintain fit as well as calm during your flight. Be aware that there are international rules regulating transportation of certain prescription drugs. Your doctor or pharmacist may provide you with more information to avoid problems.

Editors remark, July 21st:

Uncle Tom has left the following remark on the site. Thank you for a good remark to my article

"According to the World Health Organization, flight anxiety should never be treated with medication due to the increased risk of deep vein thrombosis. When flying, the risk of DVT doubles when immobile for four hours.


There are ways to treat fear of flying that are far more effective than medication. A video at http://www.fearofflying.com/video_hs.shtml explains the cause of the problem and some of the ways it can be cured."

Need of vaccination – check with your doctor?

As I traveled to South Africa last year I went to my doctor to check whether I needed vaccination. I was given a prescription for malaria tablets, and a standard package of different shots needed. If traveling to tropical or subtropical regions consult your doctor to check whether any vaccines are necessary.

Element of my small medicine box

Here is what I bring when traveling abroad.

Caution - do always consult the instructions in the packet before you start using the medication, and consult your pharmacist to find what you may need.


Immodium (loperamide) is to be taken when experiencing diarrhea. It helped through my flight with severe stomach flu. These pills should, however only be taken, if absolutely necessary, as a stomach flu often gets rid of the microbes causing the infection.
Ibuprofen – these are pills that are muscle relaxant, reduce inflammatory conditions as well as an efficient painkiller. Ibuprofen was the only thing that helped when I had severe toothache while attending a conference in London in May 2005. Should not be taken if you have an ulcer as it may irritate the digestive system.
Zyrtec (Cetirizine). I always bring allergy pills as I have a strong allergy to bites from mosquitoes and other insects. Should be taken a week prior to departure and during your trip to have full effect. If you are allergic do consult your doctor as there are many different medications on the market.
Ibuprofen cream - very good to treat aches or bruises.
Desinfecting liquid. Particularly important if you travel to warm regions, and where may need to clean open sores.
Probiotic - you may feel ill when traveling to the tropics, without having any infection. This as you are exposed to another bacterial flora. When starting to take a probiotic a week before departure you increase the amount of "nice" bacteria in your colon. This may counteract the effects of another microbiological flora.
Have a nice trip and stay fit!!!

2 comments:

Captain Tom said...

According to the World Health Organization, flight anxiety should never be treated with medication due to the increased risk of deep vein thrombosis. When flying, the risk of DVT doubles when immobile for four hours.

There are ways to treat fear of flying that are far more effective than medication. A video at http://www.fearofflying.com/video_hs.shtml explains the cause of the problem and some of the ways it can be cured.

M. Hopson said...

I have a question about probiotics. Would the yogurt bought at stores be enough to serve as the probiotics? or supplements is still the way to go? I do have my supplements which I get here http://probiotics.mercola.com/probiotics.html but I'm worried that I could run off of it while overseas and I'm not sure they have probiotic supplements similar to this one.